Iodine and Salt

by Michelle
(Richmond, VA)

They added iodine to salt because we weren't getting enough elsewhere, right? Sort of the same theory as added floride to the water supply? If we don't use convential salt where should we get it from?

Comments for Iodine and Salt

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Sources of Iodine
by: HFHR

Hi Michelle,
Yes, we are deficient in iodine but sadly, even if we are using iodine-fortified table salt, we may still be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. One study done at the University in Texas at Arlington, and published in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology, found that salt alone cannot prevent iodine deficiency. Combine that with the chemicals used to produce table salt and ask if it is really worth it.

The best form of any nutrient is a natural one and most seafood, including seaweeds such as kelp, is very high in iodine. There are also some very good iodine supplements out there.

Here's my web page on Iodine in Your Diet. There are also links to videos by doctors and naturopaths to watch!

Thank you
by: Colin Waddell

This is a very informative (and well written)piece of work. Iodine is an issue that we have all become accustomed to assuming that salt intake will take care of. Since most health-conscious people have reduced their salt intake to pre-"goiter" levels, it's a definite avenue to explore. Thank you for this contribution.

iodine and fluoride
by: Public Awakening Productions

Someone commented on here regarding that iodine is added to salt because we don't get enough iodine like fluoride is added to public water because we don't get enough fluoride. One thing which should be clearly understood is that iodine is an essential nutrient whereas fluoride is not. In fact fluoride has been proven to be ineffective for tooth decay prevention systemically. It's like drinking sunblock before going to the beach. Also, the fluoride which is added to most municipal water supplies is actually hydrofluorosilicic acid which is a hazardous waste product of the fertilizer, phosphate and nuclear material mining industries and has an EPA toxicity rating of 4 which is the highest rating. America is one of only a handful of countries left which still add this toxic waste to the public water supplies. Almost all other countries on earth have banned it due to its links to dozens of health problems.

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